Christchurch is traveled back in time to 1979 for the filming of a new film

Christchurch is transported back in time to the late 1970s for a new film set in the city.

A store on New Regent St became Middle Earth Records on Thursday, with posters for 1970s bands Toy Love and Public Image in the window, for the filming of the feature film Head South.

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie’s film is set in 1979 and is inspired by his youth playing in post-punk bands. It stars musician Benee, Australian film star Ed Oxenbould, Lord of the Rings actor Marton Csokas and Shortland Street regular Roxie Mohebbi.

Ogilvie said the film is in week two of a five-week shoot on location in Christchurch. They have filmed at the Bridge of Remembrance, Christ’s College, Bill Sutton House and plan to film outside City Hall next week.

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A <a class=punk band is performing this week at a recreation of the infamous Mollett Street punk venue in Christchurch.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Dougal Holmes/Supplied

A punk band is performing this week at a recreation of the infamous Mollett Street punk venue in Christchurch.

An old brick building on Fitzgerald Ave was transformed this week into an infamous Christchurch punk venue that occupied a former market building on Mollett St from 1979 to 1980.

Ogilvie said he researched locations in Christchurch evoking the late 1970s.

“It was easier than everyone told me,” he said.

“We are aiming for the iconic aspects of Christchurch. Everything is still there to some extent. From certain angles we can get it.

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie on the set of Head South, which was filming on New Regent St on Thursday.

CHRIS SKELTON / Stuff

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie on the set of Head South, which was filming on New Regent St on Thursday.

He was keen to showcase examples of the distinctive style of modernist architecture in Christchurch, exemplified by the town hall.

“I would really like to celebrate not only the music, but the architecture of Christchurch.”

The vintage record store created on New Regent St was a tribute to a record store run by Tony Peake on the University of Canterbury campus in the 1970s and 1980s.

“His record store was the hub of hip music. It was the beating heart of all things exciting.

A shop on New Regent St was transformed into a 1970s record store for the film.

CHRIS SKELTON / Stuff

A shop on New Regent St was transformed into a 1970s record store for the film.

Ogilvie made a name for himself in the 1980s making gripping videos for Flying Nun bands like The Bats and Headless Chickens. His most famous video was She Speeds for the Straitjacket Fits, which was filmed in Lyttelton Tunnel.

He said the film was based on his time playing in bands in the 1970s and 80s in Christchurch.

“It’s very autobiographical.

“The story follows a young child called Angus who finds himself alone with his world-weary father when his mother leaves with another man.

“He discovered the world of underground music in Christchurch, which was just beginning and performed in warehouses and any rundown place where you could fit an amp.

Ed Oxenbould plays Angus in the movie Head South.

Dougal Holmes/Supplied

Ed Oxenbould plays Angus in the movie Head South.

“It’s almost an origin story for Flying Nun as it sets up the musical and cultural climate of the time that inspired Roger Shephard to create Flying Nun.”

Actor Ed Oxenbould plays Angus, the young man who discovers Christchurch’s underground post-punk music scene. Oxenbould starred alongside Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal and starred in a film directed by M. Night Shyamalan.

He learned to play bass for his role in Head South.

“I first talked to Jonathan about the film a year and a half ago. I bought a second-hand bass to get into character.

Kiwi musician Benee stars in Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie's film, set in 1979.

RICKY WILSON/STUFF

Kiwi musician Benee stars in Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie’s film, set in 1979.

“But the movie was delayed and before I knew it I was a bassist.

“One of the perks of the job was learning to play bass.”

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