Punk Band – Go Go Go Airheart http://gogogoairheart.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:06:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gogogoairheart.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Punk Band – Go Go Go Airheart http://gogogoairheart.com/ 32 32 Every song in the Holiday Special Awesome Mix https://gogogoairheart.com/every-song-in-the-holiday-special-awesome-mix/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:06:19 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/every-song-in-the-holiday-special-awesome-mix/ There’s a lot to expect from James Gunn Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special, from seeing beloved characters to meeting this Kevin Bacon guy. He’s a great hero. Less cheerful is the fact that the release of Disney+ only leaves one more outing for Gunn and the Guardians. But fans can cheer themselves up by […]]]>

There’s a lot to expect from James Gunn Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special, from seeing beloved characters to meeting this Kevin Bacon guy. He’s a great hero. Less cheerful is the fact that the release of Disney+ only leaves one more outing for Gunn and the Guardians. But fans can cheer themselves up by immersing themselves in the music that makes up the Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special Awesome mix.


Music is just as much a character of the guardians of the galaxy movies like Rocket or Groot. The music of Quill’s youth — and not coincidentally Gunn’s — permeates these stories. It makes sense that even with a Christmas theme, it’s not Andy Williams or Bing Crosby dominating the tracklist. In fact, this mixture contains two original songsflying Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2previous recording of a single original song. (Still Gunn included David Hasselhoff on that one, so let’s call it a coin toss.) Here’s the Star-Lord — and his impressive medley of Christmas songs.

RELATED: GotG Vol. 3’s Zoe Saldana is ready to leave Gamora behind


“Dead By X-Mas” by Hanoi Rocks

“Dead By X-Mas” was released in 1983 as the Finnish rock sensation’s exclusive pre-album single. It eventually appeared on the band’s third album, Self-destruction blues. Although they’ve split up twice in public, the Hanoi Rocks lineup heard on this track recently reunited for original vocalist Michael Monroe’s 60th birthday performance. Thanks to James Gunn, they will have a little Christmas boost.

“Christmas Treat” by Julian Casablancas

Most famous singer of The Strokes, Casablancas has a close relationship with the musical actors at Saturday Night Live. He was in one of Lonely Island’s popular digital shorts called “Boombox”, but known as “the Boiled Goose”. This song is the cover of Casablancas du SNL “I Wish It Was Christmas Today” skit featuring Jimmy Fallon, Horatio Sanz. Tracy Morgan and Chris Kattan.

“Mrs. Claus” by Little Jackie

Little Jackie is one of the newest groups to appear on the Awesome Mix playlist, formed in 2008 when Imani Coppola and Adam Pallin named the group after the 1989 song “Little Jackie Wants to be a Star” by Lisa Lisa and the Cult Jam. This song dates back to 2010 and may be memorable from a Target holiday commercial.

RELATED: Changing Atlantis to Talokan In Wakanda Forever was a perfect call

“Like Christmas” door Low

Formed in 1993 in Duluth, Minnesota, Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker (and some bassist) form the indie rock band Low. “Just Like Christmas”, comes from their 1999 EP simply titled Christmas which features original songs and some covers of classics like “Silent Night” and “Blue Christmas”.

“Christmas” by Smashing Pumpkins

Ever since Kraglin gave Peter Quill that Zune at the end of Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2his musical tastes came out of the 1970s and 1980s. Billy Corgan wrote “Christmastime” for A Very Special Christmas 3. These compilation albums raised money for the Special Olympics and were a staple of the then-hip adults’ holiday season. In addition to showing up in the MCU, the group just released the first installment of Atum: A rock opera in three acts. They too appeared in one of The simpsons‘ best episodes.

“Fairytale of New York” by The Pogues feat. Kirsty MacColl

The Pogues are the giants of first-wave Celtic punk, and “Fairytale of New York” is another song that has become an unintentional Christmas classic. But it wouldn’t be punk if it weren’t for controversy. Some language used in the song’s storytelling elements contains slurs, but censored versions of the song exist. The Pogues have broken up and reunited more than once – as a punk band should – although they haven’t been active in years.

RELATED: The DCU and MCU can learn a major lesson from James Bond

“Christmas Wrapping” by Waitresses

James Gunn keeps the 1980s for The first Disney+ project planned by Marvel, and The Waitresses’ “Christmas Wrapping” is a treat from this period. The group was led by the late great Patty Donahue until her departure in 1984. The song is a classic new wave composition that sounds exactly like 1980s pop is meant to feel. It’s a Christmas song that could be on the year-round playlist.

“It’s Christmas ?” by the wombats

The Wombats are another 21st century band with a 20th century sounding name and style. They have released five records so far, and “Is This Christmas?” was a single from their debut album The Wombats Proudly Present: A Guide to Love, Loss and Despair. Proceeds from this song go to MENCAPa charity that helps children with learning disabilities.

“I Want an Alien for Christmas” from Fountains of Wayne

This piece is a bittersweet inclusion in the Holiday special, because Fountains of Wayne founding member Adam Schlesinger died of complications from COVID-19 in April 2020 during the first wave of the pandemic. Formed in 1995, the band were a staple on alternative rock playlists. “I Want an Alien for Christmas” is taken from their album Out of state platesreleased in 2005. Its inclusion follows the special tribute to David Bowie.

RELATED: Ant-Man 3 Photo Shows Kang’s Marvel Comics Costume Accuracy

“Here It Is Christmastime” by Kevin Bacon and The Old 97’s & “I Don’t Know What Christmas Is (But Christmastime Is Here)” by The Old 97’s

James Gunn, Kevin Bacon and Sean Gunn in Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special

These are two original songs for the Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special. Skilled Musician Kevin Bacon joins The Old 97’s, who recently released their 12th studio album, on “Here It Is Christmastime.” The Dallas, Texas-based alt-country band then adds their own track, “I Don’t Know What Christmas Is (But Christmastime Is Here),” while play rock and roll aliens. Their music has appeared in numerous films and TV series, including Gunn’s feature debut. Slide. Their name refers to the 1903 rail disaster involving Southern Railway train No. 97.

As Gunn’s tweet noted, the awesome mix for Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special will be released on physical media and via streaming by Hollywood Records. But aside from the original songs, fans can tune in now and get the Christmas mood started early. At the very least, the special will provide a nice upbeat story before the bittersweet arrival of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3.

The Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special debuts November 25 on Disney+.

]]>
Christchurch is traveled back in time to 1979 for the filming of a new film https://gogogoairheart.com/christchurch-is-traveled-back-in-time-to-1979-for-the-filming-of-a-new-film/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/christchurch-is-traveled-back-in-time-to-1979-for-the-filming-of-a-new-film/ Christchurch is transported back in time to the late 1970s for a new film set in the city. A store on New Regent St became Middle Earth Records on Thursday, with posters for 1970s bands Toy Love and Public Image in the window, for the filming of the feature film Head South. Christchurch director Jonathan […]]]>

Christchurch is transported back in time to the late 1970s for a new film set in the city.

A store on New Regent St became Middle Earth Records on Thursday, with posters for 1970s bands Toy Love and Public Image in the window, for the filming of the feature film Head South.

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie’s film is set in 1979 and is inspired by his youth playing in post-punk bands. It stars musician Benee, Australian film star Ed Oxenbould, Lord of the Rings actor Marton Csokas and Shortland Street regular Roxie Mohebbi.

Ogilvie said the film is in week two of a five-week shoot on location in Christchurch. They have filmed at the Bridge of Remembrance, Christ’s College, Bill Sutton House and plan to film outside City Hall next week.

READ MORE:
* ‘Small renaissance’ for Canterbury cinema as two films secure funding
* ‘We can shoot any world we want’: New $95m film studio planned for Christchurch
* Star Trek actor John Cho shone through New Zealand for 18 months
* Move over Wellywood, it’s time for… Christywood?

A <a class=punk band is performing this week at a recreation of the infamous Mollett Street punk venue in Christchurch.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Dougal Holmes/Supplied

A punk band is performing this week at a recreation of the infamous Mollett Street punk venue in Christchurch.

An old brick building on Fitzgerald Ave was transformed this week into an infamous Christchurch punk venue that occupied a former market building on Mollett St from 1979 to 1980.

Ogilvie said he researched locations in Christchurch evoking the late 1970s.

“It was easier than everyone told me,” he said.

“We are aiming for the iconic aspects of Christchurch. Everything is still there to some extent. From certain angles we can get it.

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie on the set of Head South, which was filming on New Regent St on Thursday.

CHRIS SKELTON / Stuff

Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie on the set of Head South, which was filming on New Regent St on Thursday.

He was keen to showcase examples of the distinctive style of modernist architecture in Christchurch, exemplified by the town hall.

“I would really like to celebrate not only the music, but the architecture of Christchurch.”

The vintage record store created on New Regent St was a tribute to a record store run by Tony Peake on the University of Canterbury campus in the 1970s and 1980s.

“His record store was the hub of hip music. It was the beating heart of all things exciting.

A shop on New Regent St was transformed into a 1970s record store for the film.

CHRIS SKELTON / Stuff

A shop on New Regent St was transformed into a 1970s record store for the film.

Ogilvie made a name for himself in the 1980s making gripping videos for Flying Nun bands like The Bats and Headless Chickens. His most famous video was She Speeds for the Straitjacket Fits, which was filmed in Lyttelton Tunnel.

He said the film was based on his time playing in bands in the 1970s and 80s in Christchurch.

“It’s very autobiographical.

“The story follows a young child called Angus who finds himself alone with his world-weary father when his mother leaves with another man.

“He discovered the world of underground music in Christchurch, which was just beginning and performed in warehouses and any rundown place where you could fit an amp.

Ed Oxenbould plays Angus in the movie Head South.

Dougal Holmes/Supplied

Ed Oxenbould plays Angus in the movie Head South.

“It’s almost an origin story for Flying Nun as it sets up the musical and cultural climate of the time that inspired Roger Shephard to create Flying Nun.”

Actor Ed Oxenbould plays Angus, the young man who discovers Christchurch’s underground post-punk music scene. Oxenbould starred alongside Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal and starred in a film directed by M. Night Shyamalan.

He learned to play bass for his role in Head South.

“I first talked to Jonathan about the film a year and a half ago. I bought a second-hand bass to get into character.

Kiwi musician Benee stars in Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie's film, set in 1979.

RICKY WILSON/STUFF

Kiwi musician Benee stars in Christchurch director Jonathan Ogilvie’s film, set in 1979.

“But the movie was delayed and before I knew it I was a bassist.

“One of the perks of the job was learning to play bass.”

]]>
The Classical Roots of Musical Stardom: Beethoven, Paganini and Liszt https://gogogoairheart.com/the-classical-roots-of-musical-stardom-beethoven-paganini-and-liszt/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 18:19:13 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/the-classical-roots-of-musical-stardom-beethoven-paganini-and-liszt/ It’s no secret that music has a special attraction for young people. It is often an integral part of their identity and the main source of their models, good or bad (the “sick”, in particular, standing out). Rock stars and hip-hop artists become distant mentors who heighten negative emotions and create unrealistic expectations for life. […]]]>

It’s no secret that music has a special attraction for young people. It is often an integral part of their identity and the main source of their models, good or bad (the “sick”, in particular, standing out). Rock stars and hip-hop artists become distant mentors who heighten negative emotions and create unrealistic expectations for life.

There was a time when not all musical celebrities were white noise and hot air. Rock stardom, in fact, has its roots in the most polished genre: classical music. The inspirations for these characters, however, were quite different from what drove the Rolling Stones, and their accomplishments were also on a much grander scale.

Beethoven: the creative genius

The European social order began to change in the 19th century. The Napoleonic Wars led to the demise of many small states and their aristocratic courts that patronized artists. As industrialization gave rise to a middle class, many musicians turned to the market to earn a living by teaching, performing, and composing to order.

“Beethoven”, 1820, by Karl Joseph Stieler. (Public domain)

Beethoven capitalized on this change. The appearance of his deafness marks a personal crisis that forces him to stop performing. He contemplated suicide but resolved not to. Throwing himself into his music, he developed a heroic individual style that expressed his emotions and made him popular enough to sell his work to the highest bidder. The more introspective and challenging style of his later years further redefined what music could do. When he died, more than 10,000 people filled the streets of Vienna to watch his funeral procession.

Beethoven became a cultural hero after his death. As J. Peter Burkholder, Donald Jay Grout and Claude V. Palisca note in “A History of Western Music” (WW Norton & Company, seventh edition, 2006): “His life story helped define the romantic vision of the creative artist. as a social outsider who bravely suffers to bring humanity a glimpse of the divine through art.

Paganini: The Virtuoso

Another trend at the time was that musicians began to specialize in one instrument or genre. The prodigies honed their craft to unprecedented levels and amazed audiences with their technical prowess.

Epoch Times Photo
A portrait of Niccolò Paganini, circa 1830, by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Public domain)

One of the most distinguished of these virtuosos was Niccolò Paganini, often cited as the greatest violinist of all time. His talent was so abundant – and his desire to show it – that in his most famous performance he broke first one string, then a second and shortly after a third. With only one string remaining, he finished the piece flawlessly to thunderous applause. It was no accident: he composed some of his pieces so that they could be played with a single string and filed the rest so that they would break during performance.

Paganini suffered from a host of ailments throughout his life. He probably had either Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, disorders that affect the body’s ability to produce connective tissue and gave him a skeletal appearance. In addition to this, it has been suggested that he suffered from tuberculosis and syphilis. To cure syphilis, he was given mercury, which made him lose all his teeth.

Like Beethoven, Paganini transcended his health crises through art. According to his mother, an angel came to her while she was pregnant with him and told her that her son would be destined for greatness, but at a cost. The syndrome affecting his connective tissue also gave him long and flexible fingers. As the sickly boy grew older, he devoted all his free time to mastering the violin until he could play 12 notes per second. His showmanship and dedication to his craft set the standard for violinists who followed him.

Liszt: The Rock Star

Francois Liszt embodied the first musical celebrity. He idolized Beethoven who, after listening to Liszt play for him as a child, is said to have kissed the boy on the forehead and told him he would bring “joy and happiness to many”. Liszt was also inspired by Paganini and sought to become the piano virtuoso. He began giving solo recitals in large halls across Europe at the age of 11, turning the piano on stage and opening the lid to showcase the exhibit.

Epoch Times Photo
A Franz Liszt portrait by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. (artrenewal.org)

His concerts have become legendary. The poet Heinrich Heine described him playing a piano imitation: “We saw the lightning flash across his own face, his lips quivered as in a storm, and his long locks of hair seemed to be dripping with the storm he portrays.”

These performances caused states of hysteria which Heine called “Lisztomania”. People fainted. The audience rushed onto the stage, tearing apart Liszt’s velvet gloves and silk handkerchiefs for souvenirs. Women would put his locks of hair, leftover coffee, and even a cigar butt in flasks or lockets to wear.

According to Heine, a doctor explained the phenomenon by “the magnetism, the galvanism, the electricity” of perfumed and sweaty people crowded under wax lamps. Whatever the exact cause, the effect was real: Liszt was the first rock star.

freedom of form

What’s the difference between Beethoven’s brooding expression and the manic-depressive lyrics of an emo punk band? Or Liszt’s dramatic staging versus a pop star’s carnal dance routine?

Just this: that behind the disproportionate personalities, there was truth; behind the suffering, the beauty. The histrionics of Paganini and Liszt displayed a virtuosity unmatched by anyone on earth. Each composed new technically challenging pieces and shaped performance traditions, such as the expectation that players memorize pieces instead of relying on sheet music.

Paganini’s 24 Caprices for Solo Violin pushed the instrument to its limits with its plucked string (pizzicato) effects and harmonies, as well as its fingering and tuning methods. Liszt’s Piano Sonata in B Minor reinvented sonata form by eliminating pauses between movements, restructuring themes, and experimenting with tones. The choral ode that Beethoven weaved into the climax of his Ninth Symphony drew on tradition to create something startlingly new.

In his same series of “Feuillons musicals” dealing with Liszt, Heine asks: “What is the highest in art?” Which is also the highest in all other manifestations of life: the conscious freedom of the spirit. He observes that this “projects us this miraculous breath of eternity”, which places the performer on the same spiritual level as the composer.

Heine, however, distinguishes between freedom “of form” and freedom of “material”, cautioning against artists who lose themselves in the latter as being “generally limited and chained in spirit”. Musicians who are ready to talk about anything will escalate into, well, look around at the top of the charts for a while before sinking into obscurity forever.

By linking freedom to eternity, Heine illustrates the paradox of freedom: to be meaningful, it must tap into something objective. Beethoven, Paganini and Liszt all combined their innovations with a respect for the past and in doing so created something timeless.

Andrew Benson Brown

Follow

Andrew Benson Brown is a Missouri-based poet, journalist, and writing coach. He is an editor at Bard Owl Publishing and Communications and the author of “Legends of Liberty”, an epic poem about the American Revolution. For more information, visit Apollogist.wordpress.com.

]]>
A new artistic movement attracts natives of Youngstown | News, Sports, Jobs https://gogogoairheart.com/a-new-artistic-movement-attracts-natives-of-youngstown-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:03:33 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/a-new-artistic-movement-attracts-natives-of-youngstown-news-sports-jobs/ Photo Submitted / Brendan T. McNally …. Youngstown native Brendan T. McNally, right, and Amir Diop stand next to their collaborative painting by legendary artist, painter and cultural leader Jean Michel Basquiat. Basquiat was one of the central figures of the neo-expressionist movement. While recording “Kind of Blue”, Miles Davis brought […]]]>

Photo Submitted / Brendan T. McNally …. Youngstown native Brendan T. McNally, right, and Amir Diop stand next to their collaborative painting by legendary artist, painter and cultural leader Jean Michel Basquiat. Basquiat was one of the central figures of the neo-expressionist movement.

While recording “Kind of Blue”, Miles Davis brought some notes to the studio sessions.

Instead, its fast-paced improvisational harmonies and melodies painted a picture; his legendary sextet featuring John Coltrane, Bill Evans and Cannonball Adderley, accompanied by an equally talented rhythm section, has been added to the canvas.

This marriage of different styles creates a sensory experience like no other. That’s exactly what artist and Youngstown native Brendan T. McNally, 40, is trying to conjure up with his collaboration partner, artist Amir Diop, in their Neo Savage movement.

“It’s an idea of ​​putting art between multiple artists – the idea is like jazz where you paint on a common canvas the same way you have a bass, a soloist, a pianist in a band and they play against each other to complement each other’s style,” McNally said.

The two met at the height of the pandemic in 2020, with both artists riding on what McNally described as a “Mad Max-esque” post-apocalyptic SoHo, where businesses had been boarded up with plywood, partly to because of the lockdowns, in large part because of the societal unrest sparked by the police shooting of George Floyd creating space for an artistic revolution marred by protests.

“It is poetic that this artistic movement began as a sign of protest and turned into a project of revitalization. Not a financial revitalization, but a spiritual one. NYC heart grows, I showed up and it came to fruition. The paint was as much from the street as it was from me,” McNally said.

Combining the styles of several artists creates something new.

Prior to this point, McNally had no experience in the field of street art.

The transition was born out of desperation after he lost his online teaching job at Ohio State University, where he taught foreign scientists who were later to become research professors at OSU to work on their English skills. and in teaching.

Recalling that time, McNally said: “It was a surreal experience where I got to listen to the highest level of scientists who conducted million dollar research projects, as they simulated interviews in several fields of study.”

When the pandemic hit, the opportunity faded as researchers returned home to their countries, just as McNally returned to New York in late 2019 with her 5-year-old daughter.

“We had become temporarily homeless for a while at the time and crashed into another artist’s studio in SoHo,” McNally said. “A close friend saw the condemned buildings, called me and said I should go there and paint a mural.”

The Canfield High School graduate used to paint unsung heroes in the 1990s.

During his formative years, he attended the Columbus College of Arts, where McNally developed his style based on drawing civil rights figures, describing it as his way of paying homage to the unsung heroes left behind in the story.

“My original artistic influences came from researching the Old Masters, as most of the artwork I had access to in the pre-internet area of ​​Youngstown was in history books,” McNally said.

McNally described the experience of painting on the streets of SoHo as a “spiritual experience” that gave him the chance to live out a childhood fantasy of painting in the infamous neighborhood known as a hub for artists in the 70s and 80s.

As the marchers descended Broadway Avenue, letting their voices be heard, McNally let his paintbrush channel his feelings onto a piece of plywood; creating ‘River Unknown’, a mural of the late Floyd and a first look at the Neo Savage style.

“Neo started out as a convenient way for me and Diop to get around the fact that we had no money, we just had the paint provided to us. We took turns using the paint for our street murals. and the idea came to me to collaborate,” McNally said.

Their movement merges their contrasting styles, with McNally’s work adding classical elements to the portraits, and Diop adding street and jazz elements, with heavy use of bright colors and cartoons.

With increased media coverage and a growing interest from local businesses in using the work of street artists to beautify the city, McNally, Diop and several other artists formed the Soho Renaissance Factory, an artists’ collective and a group of community outreach that strengthened their working relationship.

“We were trying to help the community and the community helped us; we were bringing people back to the area, so that was a positive thing and the business community latched onto it,” McNally said.

Catching the attention of the NoMo Hotel, the hotel hosted SRF artists, giving them the opportunity to live there while giving them carte blanche to paint murals inside the hotel. For a time McNally’s Nina Simone mural hung in the hotel lobby, preserving his work which originated in the street.

Meanwhile, McNally’s work was showcased all over town – a huge feat for a Youngstown kid who had never considered going this far.

ROOTS OF YOUNGSTOWN

McNally often stayed with his grandparents on Orlo Lane near Midlothian Boulevard and the first years in a flat with his parents on Southern Boulevard opposite St. Dominic’s Church.

Looking back, he remembers that it was a time when mafia crimes were commonplace.

Even if you weren’t directly part of that lifestyle, McNally said living in the area meant there was bound to be some overlap.

“I grew up at the Mickey bar. My father was a bartender there, I had been there since I was 4 years old. It was allegedly a mafia bar,” he said.

Around this time, McNally said it was not uncommon to see sections of streets shut down as gunfights broke out between Mafia and gang members.

“Everyone thought there was more to every story, everyone had lips of steel, nobody talked about it but everyone knew it,” McNally said. “When I left it was tough in the city, I was worried about my grandparents.”

Despite the rough edges, the area still remains close to it – the memories of nights spent cruising downtown for punk rock shows at the Draft House.

“There was another place too,” McNally said happily, reminiscing; the place that escaped him for a moment was Nyabinghi.

A time capsule of Youngstown, McNally described it as the pinnacle of the city’s strange underground side.

“It looked like something out of the movie 8-mile. They had rap battles one night and moved on to hardcore heavy death metal the next,” he said. “Youngstown is a very unique place that has that old world feel. There are small enclaves where people there have lived so much.

McNally eventually left the area for a time after losing his passion for art and dropping out of CCAD.

“After that I had a loss of identity, all my life I thought I was going to be an artist,” McNally said. “Almost relative to this life, I joined the Air Force in 2003 at the start of the Iraq war and they trained me as an intelligence analyst.”

AVIATION

For six years, McNally served in the Air Force, and between 2006 and 2008 he had three deployments to Afghanistan, Iraq and Germany.

“Meanwhile, I started painting again as a means of self-therapy toward the end of the deployment,” McNally said. “I was struggling mentally. I was painting things I saw there, drawing and selling paintings for officers who wanted work done for them while being in a combat zone.

After the army, McNally found it difficult to accept his time in service.

“When I came back, I felt pretty guilty because I didn’t have this idea that ‘ignorance is a happiness factor,’ so I was kind of torn about how I felt,” McNally said. To cure his nerves, he turns again to art.

McNally worked a series of jobs before moving to New York for the first time from 2009 to 2012, crashing on the floor of a brownstone among 11 skaters, including Matt Lilly, a native of Youngstown, who organized events skating using a backyard halfpipe they had built in the backyard.

These events were infamous in the neighborhood, becoming known as “Shred-stuy” drawing crowds of hundreds, accompanied by five rock bands playing on the rooftops.

Lilly is someone McNally credits with saving his life. Before moving to New York, he was on the verge of becoming homeless.

Making a bit of a name for himself on Brooklyn’s avant-garde scene, McNally said years of partying, drug use and the Army’s realization of his PTSD left him looking for more. stability.

“I didn’t like his competitiveness, so I stopped painting for a few years. It happens a lot with artists where they start having artist blocks and they start relying on substances to do it for them,” McNally said.

He returned to Ohio from 2012 to 2013 to use his GI bill to pursue ESL studies at Kent State University, where he met the future mother of his child and his wife (they later divorced ). During this time, he taught English at a German high school for four months.

In 2014, McNally taught English to business executives in Mexico until her daughter was born in September. McNally was at a crossroads where he had to admit he couldn’t raise a child while traveling.

He pursued a master’s degree at Columbia University in Applied Linguistics in 2016. Subsequently, he obtained a teaching position at Auburn University which turned into his eventual position at OSU.

In his current life, McNally overlooks the Empire State Building from his studio on the corner of Bowery and Spring Street as he and Diop work developing art for a startup app, which provides painting space and business connections for both.

The couple hope the movement will turn into a school.

“I want people to learn how to do a job and then figure out how to monetize it. Almost like an artist incubator,” McNally said.

To suggest a Saturday profile, contact Editor-in-Chief Burton Cole at bcole@tribtoday.com or Metro Editor-in-Chief Marly Reichert at mreichert@tribtoday.com.

cmcbride@tribtoday.com



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox









]]>
Nosebleed: Dance With The Devil – Album Review https://gogogoairheart.com/nosebleed-dance-with-the-devil-album-review/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 10:20:44 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/nosebleed-dance-with-the-devil-album-review/ Nosebleed: Dance with the Devil (TNS Recordings) LP | CDs | DL Released November 11 Garage rockers Leeds Nosebleed return with choppy tunes and polished radio-friendly songs alongside dirt. One of the best garage punk bands to have been vomited up by the UK DIY punk scene in recent years, Nosebleed deliver a glorious racket […]]]>

Nosebleed: Dance with the Devil

(TNS Recordings)

LP | CDs | DL

Released November 11

Garage rockers Leeds Nosebleed return with choppy tunes and polished radio-friendly songs alongside dirt.

One of the best garage punk bands to have been vomited up by the UK DIY punk scene in recent years, Nosebleed deliver a glorious racket of rock and roll. They tend towards the choppy, staccato guitar flavor of the garage and, although half-paced for the most part, they can rack up a frantic head of steam. The guitar solos are short enough to add a boost without disrupting the flow, and fit right in with the garage and punk tradition. Think James Williamson meets Johnny Thunders with added reverb.

A few nice heavy floor toms provide the drive when the drummer isn’t hitting a slappy beat with his high hats and snare drums. They’re paired with bass played with the thundering intensity of Dee Dee Ramone and the odd sliver of gloriously dirty overdrive. In keeping with the garage vibe, the vocals are gravelly but they’re loud rather than shrill, with an odd rock’n’roll edge.

Nosebleed live shotIt’s tempting to say that Nosebleed’s DNA draws heavily from the very raw UK garage sound of Armitage Shanks, Thee Headcoats and the general production of Wild Billy Childish but, despite similarities in song structures, they don’t are not so lo-fi. Given their optimistic view of the garage, they are more like the New Bomb Turks.

The polished production of this album by Andy Hawkins at Nave Studio in Leeds pushes them towards high-output garage rock revivalists like The Hives at times. And surely every garage band has a touch of Sonics lurking in the background.

The fun video for the title track Dance With The Devil is a good showcase for Nosebleed at its best. High-octane rock ‘n’ roll meets garage with a chorus that could have been borrowed from The Ramones.

All this is very good but we must talk about the keyboards. They grew on me, but on first listen, they just weren’t enough for me. I could see what they were looking for and it created a New York Dolls vibe but had an ominous Chas’n’Dave touch to it. A few listens and I’ll concede it’s less Chas and Dave and more Jerry (Lee Lewis) and Jim (Jones Revue).

This album certainly has the standard garage punk vibe like previous Nosebleed releases. However, in places they have broken out into what may be a fairly limited genre. There are a few tracks that channel psychobilly sounds: Let It Go, with its twangy guitar, and Round and Round, which has a catchy chorus.

Under The Knife is very much Rawk with a capital R and shows that Eliot Verity can actually sing as well as rage. He further displays his vocal ability on All I Know, which really goes off-road. There’s more psychobilly twang, a touch of spaghetti western and the combination of vocals and guitar reminds me of The Damned as they explore their psychedelic roots. With its poppy chorus, it stands out from the rest of the album and could be an 80s radio hit. There’s no reason it can’t now.

Likewise, the closer album Make Up Your Mind is a slow number but something about the delivery made me think of 13th Floor Elevators.

Overall, Dance With The Devil is an enjoyable half-hour of rock and roll stripped down to love and relationship breakups with a few melodic interludes. Yes, it’s clichés but it’s rock’n’roll.

Available from TNS recordings and streaming services.

Nosebleeds are ongoing Facebook and instagram.

~

Lyrics by Nathan Brown. Discover his Stronger than War Author Archives.

We have a small favor to ask of you. Subscribe to Louder Than War and help keep the flame of independent music burning. Click the button below to see the extras you get!

SUBSCRIBE TO LTW

]]>
31 Weirdest Easter Eggs in ‘Weird: The Al Yankovic Story’ https://gogogoairheart.com/31-weirdest-easter-eggs-in-weird-the-al-yankovic-story/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 01:44:04 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/31-weirdest-easter-eggs-in-weird-the-al-yankovic-story/ “Weird Al” Yankovic has one of the most intense, loyal, obsessive, and just plain weird fanbases in all of pop culture. He knows his fans will listen to his albums and watch his videos again and again, so he fills them with neat little details you won’t notice on your first, second, or even twenty-seventh […]]]>

“Weird Al” Yankovic has one of the most intense, loyal, obsessive, and just plain weird fanbases in all of pop culture. He knows his fans will listen to his albums and watch his videos again and again, so he fills them with neat little details you won’t notice on your first, second, or even twenty-seventh listen.

And… I… the author of this article, should know. I wrote the book about Al, and with Al, in the 2012 coffee table book Weird Al: The Book (which is credited to Nathan Rabin with Al Yankovic), then followed it with several other books on the pop parodist, including 2020′ Jthe weird accordion to al: ridiculously ill-advised vanity editiona 500-page guide to his life’s work in music, TV and film, and the newly released coloring book The Weird A-Coloring to Al: Cynical Movie Cash-In Editionjust out.

In any event. Yankovic is greeted enthusiastically Roku fake biopic Bizarre: the story of Al Yankovic, which recently won the Midnight Madness People’s Choice Award at the prestigious Toronto International Film Festival and opens to a deafening buzz. Although the film is very not a true account of the real life of Al Yankovicit is filled with many references to the tradition of Weird Al.

Here are 31 nifty Easter eggs and deep references you might have missed Weird: The Al Yankovic Story.

  1. Lin-Manuel Miranda: The surgeon who revives “Weird Al” Yankovic in the opening scene is Al’s close friend Lin-Manuel Miranda, the subject of Al’s “The Hamilton Polka”.
  2. Mad Magazinee : Crazy magazine mascot Alfred E. Neuman can be seen in the background of several scenes, a tribute to Al’s love for the magazine, a major influence on his music and films. Mad numbers can also be found in Al’s childhood bedroom.
  3. bing crosby: Al’s father mockingly compares his son to Bing Crosby, a father famous for his coldness and emotional abuse like Al’s in the film.
  4. Music man: Thomas Lennon’s viciously abused and anachronistic accordion salesman is a parody of con man Henry Higgins from The music man.
  5. Polka night: As a teenager, Al attends a wild and loud polka party, a nod to his unsuccessful 1986 album, Polka Party!
  6. Comedy shot! Bang! The cop who brings young Al back to his parents from polka night is played by podcast host Scott Aukerman Comedy shot! Bang! and its television adaptation, which featured Al as the conductor in its fifth and final season.
  7. The group: Although they are never mentioned by their full names, Al’s housemates who became band members are his real band Steve Jay, Jim “Kimo” West, and drummer Jon “Bermuda” Schwartz.
  8. UHF: When Al snatches a ticket for the band’s auditions, a flyer for Kuni’s karate school – which featured prominently in the film UHF – can be seen in the background.
  9. Punk: Al auditions for a punk band while playing a solo accordion version of “Beat on the Brat”, a song he covered for a Dr. Demento punk compilation. Demento, incidentally, was also one of the first DJs to play The Ramones.
  10. Science of mystery: One of the punks who rejects Al’s audition is played by the comedian and Mystery Science Theater 3000 host Jonah Ray, who released a “Weird Al” Yankovic punk cover EP titled You Can’t Call Me Al.
  11. Future foods: When Al is making the bologna sandwich that inspires “My Bologna”, Cap’n Crunch and Raisin Bran can be seen in the background, foreshadowing their appearance in “Eat It”.
  12. Bologna: Al recording “My Bologna” in a bathroom near the bus station with good acoustics is a reference to him recording “My Bologna” in a bathroom for The Dr. Demento Show very early in his career.
  13. Big record deal: Al being mockedly offered a 14 album deal with Scotti Brothers is a nod to Al actually recording 14 studio albums with his band collected on the Squeeze Box.
  14. Record company: Will Forte and the real Al play the Scotti Brothers, the real owners of the label that released Al’s albums.
  15. Rocky path: Al debut “I Love Rocky Road” in a punk club is more plausible than you imagine! The original was recorded by Joan Jett, a member of founding punk band The Runaways, and Steve Jones and Paul Cook of the Sex Pistols backed Jett during his initial recording.
  16. Origin of Funny or Die: The rowdy punk rock club is played by comedian and author Patton Oswalt, who played Dr. Demento in the funny or die sketch that inspired the film and which is in the video for “Foil”.
  17. Fish heads: When Dr. Demento says the Scotti Brothers wouldn’t recognize real talent if he hit them in the face with a fish, it’s a winking tribute to Barnes and Barnes’ most popular song “Fish Heads.” from the story of Dr. .Demento Show.
  18. Art Brut : Demento compares Al to Wildman Fischer, a popular foreign artist on The Dr. Demento Show.
  19. Dirk Diggler: Demento’s pool party is a parody of Boogie nights.
  20. Devote: The men in red hats from the Demento pool party scene are members of Devo, the inspiration for Al’s “Dare to be Stupid.”
  21. Theater: Pee-Wee Herman does the dance he did for “Tequila” at Demento’s pool party
  22. Emo: Salvador Dali is played by Emo Phillips, who starred in UHF and opened for Al on several tours.
  23. Queen: John Deacon, the Queen member no one recognizes even after saying his name, is the only songwriter credited with “Another One Bites the Dust”, meaning he would have a financial incentive for Al to parody his song.
  24. Accordion case: Al being accompanied by a guy banging on an accordion case and a man making flatulent noises with his hands is a reference to his drummer Jon “Bermuda” Schwartz “playing” the accordion case on the recording original of “Another One Rides the Bus” and “Musical” pet-rock virtuoso Mike Kieffer, whose particular specialty enlivened Al’s early albums.
  25. LDS: In the film, Dr. Demento doses Al with LSD. In real life, Al shared a manager (Jay Levey) with Dr. Demento and LSD guru Timothy Leary.
  26. BCB: The Yankovic Bump refers to “The CBB Bump”, or gains popularity after someone appears on the Comedy shot! Bang! Podcast.
  27. India : Al angrily tells Demento that he won’t be the new Indiana Jones, a character he parodied in UHF.
  28. 27: When Al shows up drunk for his show and is confronted by his band members, it’s through Section 27. The number 27 has a special meaning in Al’s mythology. (However, in real life, he doesn’t drink)
  29. The doors: Al drunk and shirtless insulting the fans is a parody of a similar sequence in Oliver Stone The doors.
  30. Love in real life: The woman seated next to Al’s character during the closing ceremony is Al’s real wife, Suzanne Yankovic.
  31. RIP Coolio: The crazy-haired man scowling at Al as he performs “Amish Paradise” is the late Coolio, who objected to Al’s parody before making peace with him.

Bizarre: the story of Al Yankovic diffusion

You can only stream Weird: The story of Al Yankovic in a place, the Roku channel. It’s 100% free and you don’t need a Roku account.

]]>
Brighton and Hove News » TV Smith – no time to be 66 https://gogogoairheart.com/brighton-and-hove-news-tv-smith-no-time-to-be-66/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 10:06:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/brighton-and-hove-news-tv-smith-no-time-to-be-66/ TV Smith at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly) TV SMITH & THE BORED TEENAGERS + DAMAGE UK + THE DINZ – THE PRINCE ALBERT, BRIGHTON 30.10.22 TV blacksmith & Bored teenagers taking the time to support The Damned’s original line-up on their reunion tour (Review HERE) to bring their high-octane punk to Brighton […]]]>

TV Smith at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

TV SMITH & THE BORED TEENAGERS + DAMAGE UK + THE DINZ – THE PRINCE ALBERT, BRIGHTON 30.10.22

TV blacksmith & Bored teenagers taking the time to support The Damned’s original line-up on their reunion tour (Review HERE) to bring their high-octane punk to Brighton Prince Albert. The support tonight comes from The Dinz and UK damages.

The Dinz at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

Brighton Space Words

The Dinz hailing from Portsmouth and made up of Mark Ballard on vocals, Rob Mathew on guitar, Steve Dowdell on bass and Turkee (I’m not quite sure if that’s the name his parents gave him, but that’s what I’ve been told!) on drums. They formed four years ago with the aim of recreating 1977 punk, which they seem to have achieved quite comprehensively.

The Dinz at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

Mark Ballard is a charismatic leader, while Rob Mathew plays effective rhythm guitar mixed with some pretty searing solos. He certainly plays more and better solos than Johnny Ramone ever did! The lyrics are often quite political in a general sense. ‘Treason’ is around November 5th for example. ‘Turn that noise down’ instantly reminds me of my late father! Interestingly, the verses border on reggae. One thing that The Dinz’s music reminds you of is that punk music was quite varied and was built on a variety of different influences. Anyway, this half hour was very pleasant. I wish they could play longer.

www.facebook.com/robertsofsouthsea

GDK 2 for 1

Damage UK at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

UK damages also only have half an hour, so apparently they talk a lot less than usual! They were formed by Brian Damage and Paul Flynn of 1977 punk band Nuffin’, and joined by Reg Charles (of Xtraverts) and guitarist Alan Davidson, who is apparently a “the original Belfast punk”. Whatever his origins, his Les Paul is a very strong presence in the band’s music.

Damage UK at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

Most of their songs deal with topical issues, bringing punk bang back into fashion. “Total Surveillance” is about the proliferation of CCTV in the UK, not to mention anything recorded on cellphone cameras. “Burnt earth” relates to global warming. “The Chains of Austerity” is “about endless misery”. Very topical! Meanwhile, ‘Wire Head’ is about phone addiction. “Interesting Emptiness” on the other hand, was written in 1980. It still sounds really fresh!

Damage UK at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

They cover ‘Rosalyn’ by Pretty Things. It’s much faster than the original. ‘Cyber ​​War’ is the title track of their new album and features a reggae middle eight. It’s reminiscent of when reggae was (rightly) considered radical. Again, another song with a very modern subject. Unfortunately, the last two songs of their setlist are not played. Despite the minimal conversation, they are still running out of time! Another nice group anyway.

damageuk.bandcamp.com

TV Smith & The Bored Teenagers at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (Photo Mark Kelly)

TV blacksmith Don’t wait to get on stage with bored teenagers. He also agrees to speak to us very little due to time constraints. The first thing you notice is that The Bored Teenagers rock much louder than the previous two bands (with all due respect). However, this is not surprising as they are in their 40s at most, while the previous two groups were in their 50s and 60s.

TV Smith & The Bored Teenagers at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (Photo Mark Kelly)

If my calculations are correct, TV Smith is 66 years old and he has a lot more vitality than a man of his age could reasonably expect to have. It just doesn’t stop. Generally, as soon as a song stops, the drummer counts into the next one, and off you go. That’s how punk was then, and in fact how it should be. It’s quite a long setlist, but they’re loading it at an alarming rate! TV sticks to its promise of very few discussions, although after ‘I surrender’ he says “never surrender long” and then it’s straight into ‘Back from the dead’. After “New Church” we get another good word: “Damn the old church! It’s the new church!!!”

TV Smith at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photo Mark Kelly)

Tonight’s set is indeed a Advertisement gig, and it’s great. We get all the classic “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements”, with four songs from 1979 ‘Distribution of Thousands’. There are also a few B-sides, plus the single “The Eyes of Gary Gilmore”. The whole group is having fun. During ‘Bombsite Boy’, The TV and bassist push the TV’s upside-down mic stand toward each other. The set ends with a crash “Wonders of a deal”. There is no encore – there is no time – but what concert, what group, what man. This is the second time I’ve seen an older punk artist this year and it reminds me of the one and only time I’ve seen the Ramones. Brilliantly amazing, or amazingly brilliant. They both work!

TV Smith & The Bored Teenagers at Prince Albert, Brighton 30.10.22 (photos Mark Kelly)

Smith & The Bored Teenagers TV Setlist:
“No time to be 21” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with commercials” album)
“Security in numbers” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“We Who Wait” (from The Adverts 1977 “Security in numbers” Single)
“Novelties” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“The Drowning Men” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with commercials” album)
‘On the roof’ (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
‘My place’ (from The Adverts 1979 “Cast of Thousands” album)
“Television is over” (from The Adverts 1979 “Cast of Thousands”album)
‘On wheels’ (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
‘I surrender’ (from The Adverts 1979 “Cast of Thousands” album)
‘Back from the dead’ (from 1978 “Television is over” Single)
“Male Aggression” (from The Adverts 1979 “Cast of Thousands” album)
“New Church” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
‘Bombsite Boy’ (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“Great British Mistake” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“The Eyes of Gary Gilmore” (from The Adverts 2002 reissue of “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“Bored Teenagers” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with advertisements” album)
“Marvels of a Chord” (from The Adverts 1978 “Crossing the Red Sea with commercials” album)

tvsmith.co.uk

concert flyer

]]>
Why punk has a moment of nostalgia https://gogogoairheart.com/why-punk-has-a-moment-of-nostalgia/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/why-punk-has-a-moment-of-nostalgia/ Have we been saturated with incessant trend information thinking that the taste of 70s interiors is only represented by Scandinavian-inspired design? And it’s on the way, with interior products from the era reissued and imitated, and with constant streams of new product launches that would have been, at the very least, inspired by this style […]]]>

Have we been saturated with incessant trend information thinking that the taste of 70s interiors is only represented by Scandinavian-inspired design?

And it’s on the way, with interior products from the era reissued and imitated, and with constant streams of new product launches that would have been, at the very least, inspired by this style of design.

All good things beware, because it’s hard to beat the elegant balance of form and function that Scandinavians are so good at, but such is the hype, it’s easy to sidestep the alley of history interiors which is punk, followed by its spawn, the gothic look.

Punk is having a moment of nostalgia, falling into the realms of vintage design, thanks to Danny Boyle’s miniseries Gun (Disney+) which first screened in June, weaving its way through the rise and fall of the defining punk band of the decade, The Sex Pistols.

Ceramist Jonathan Adler’s Mohawk-inspired creations take punk themes into the realm of kitsch (pacifier holders €112.50 at www.sweetpeaandwillow.com).

But, professional hazard as it may be, I am always attracted by the action towards the aesthetics of design: decorations, clothing, furniture, accessories.

In this particular case, it’s almost impossible to ignore the pointy dog ​​collars, liberal facial piercings, ripped black fishnet tights, tartan and make-up to give sunken eyes worthy of a flu-stricken Victorian child who will not survive. Winter.

Those who wore this look with pride and rebellion, gelling their locks in spikes and mohawks, and applying thick black mascara and eyeliner in the seedy bathroom of their squats back in the day, are unlikely to get away with the look now.

But with everything fashionable – including belligerent punk – the look is making its way into our homes via the catwalks. Anyone for a tartan cushion appliquéd with a few safety pins?

Even punk’s cheeky poster child herself, fashion designer Vivienne Westwood, was inspired by the interiors of her infamous 70s clothing boutique, Sex, on London’s King’s Road, which became the destination for sales retail of punk haute couture.

She’s gotten warm these days for a collaboration with The Rug Company with what’s best described as a shabby-chic Union Jack rug, colors that blend together and are ripe for styling with immaculate contemporary sofas.

    Take inspiration from this combination of maximalist interior design enriched with punk influences if you're in the mood to introduce the theme.
Take inspiration from this combination of maximalist interior design enriched with punk influences if you’re in the mood to introduce the theme.

It sells for €4,000, or maybe that’s too expensive and too “historic” for an Irish punk rocker.

Instead, how about his painterly-style Orb cushion (punks loved trying their hand at royals) and his Mouth cushion? Both could be considered bargains in comparison, costing €800.

Curiously, there’s no sign of the acid colors of ’70s punk in its interior products, or even a vague quote. Time has passed it seems and Westwood has mellowed, completing with a series of magnolia prints in his collection instead.

Perhaps Next’s tartan cushion as a relic from that era for an accessible price of €23 will provide enough nostalgia. An alternative plaid version from Dunnes Stores for £15.99 is a little punk lurking in plain sight.

Or do you remember Jonathan Adler designing a collection for H&M HOME a few years ago? His ceramics were playful and witty, full of color and character, and although he was a young snapper in the 70s, he turned to punk for a series of conversation pieces with his signature spirit to revive the look of interiors.

    Lip designs take on a contemporary feel in Mind the Gap's Neon Kiss Indigo wallpaper (€233.80 at www.dowsingandreynolds.com).
Lip designs take on a contemporary feel in Mind the Gap’s Neon Kiss Indigo wallpaper (€233.80 at www.dowsingandreynolds.com).

But it’s more art than an act of subversion, bordering on kitsch and parody, much in the same way punk parodied royalty and the establishment. Come full circle with Adler taking the iconic mohawk hairstyle and giving it the makeover treatment as a pacifier holder for €45.

A similar treatment is applied to a menorah fashioned from a Mohawk and mulberry head to accommodate seven tapered candles, priced at €100.

    The Orb cushion by Vivienne Westwood for The Rug Company quotes the 70s parodying royalty and the establishment (€800).
The Orb cushion by Vivienne Westwood for The Rug Company quotes the 70s parodying royalty and the establishment (€800).

He even brings back the mohawk as a base for a €45 match-strike. Characteristic of the home taste of the 70s when almost everyone smoked, this accessory served as a receptacle for matches to light cigarettes and pipes, although these days are more likely to be useful for lighting a chi-scented candle. -chi to scent your home.

It’s also a possible gift option for the single punk rocker in your life who’s into nostalgia, or an acquisition for a younger recipient who loves vintage. Either way, Adler’s work has style and conversation-provoking references.

Mohawks, safety pins and tartan take center stage as subversive 70s subculture hits
21st century homes, writes Carol O’Callaghan

]]>
Hammonton’s Ace Enders relishes 20 years of The Early November https://gogogoairheart.com/hammontons-ace-enders-relishes-20-years-of-the-early-november/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/hammontons-ace-enders-relishes-20-years-of-the-early-november/ VINCENT JACKSON For the press Ace Enders, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter of Hammonton-based pop-punk band The Early November, finds himself looking back and forward as he celebrates the 20th anniversary of his band’s first national release. To commemorate the anniversary, Enders and drummer Jeff Kummer took the time to examine The Early November’s past […]]]>

VINCENT JACKSON For the press

Ace Enders, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter of Hammonton-based pop-punk band The Early November, finds himself looking back and forward as he celebrates the 20th anniversary of his band’s first national release.

To commemorate the anniversary, Enders and drummer Jeff Kummer took the time to examine The Early November’s past by listening to every song the ensemble has ever recorded that never found a place on one. of their five full-length studio albums or their three extended releases.

The Early November paved the way for their future not only by releasing a bunch of old tracks, but by releasing a new album called “Twenty,” which features seven re-recorded old songs and three completely new tracks.

“You never forget that energy. It’s easy to keep it young,” Enders, 40, said of re-recording some songs that were 20 years old.

People also read…

Early November carried the flag for original rock music at the turn of the century in South Jersey, with a national record deal, appearances on the Warped Tour, albums on the Billboard 200 chart and concerts by the size of a theatre.

“Twenty” was released on October 14 by Pure Noise Records. He promoted the album with a 20th anniversary tour with Enders and Kummer backed by a second touring guitarist and bassist. The tour kicks off Wednesday at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park.

ATLANTIC CITY — The same three Democratic city council members who joined the enemies of…

On tour, The Early November attracts its biggest crowds in major cities. Enders looks forward to concerts in San Antonio; Orlando Florida; Philadelphia Cream; New York and Chicago.

Pure Noise is the third record label in the band’s 20-year history.

“We almost know someone everywhere,” Enders said of the various record labels around the country. “I like what they (Pure Noise) have done with a few other bands in our genre.”

Enders still lives and loves Hammonton, but he moved his recording studio last year to Ocean City. The studio is just four blocks from the beach.

“It’s easy to find rooms here and find food,” Enders said of hosting visiting musicians whose songs he produces in his studio. “It’s a creative atmosphere.”

Half of “Twenty” was recorded in Hammonton, the other half in Ocean City.


Limousine drivers injured in crash on Atlantic City freeway

HAMMONTON — Two passengers in the limousine have been taken to hospital after the vehicle overturned…

The original recordings that served as the basis for the re-recorded songs on “Twenty” were performed by the quintet version of The Early November, which also featured lead guitarist Bill Lugg, bassist Sergio Anello, and keyboardist and guitarist Joseph Marro.

Kummer plays drums and Enders can be heard on vocals, guitars, bass and keyboards on the re-recorded tracks.

“I’m primarily a guitarist, so I’m very picky about tone and textures. There are so many possibilities,” Enders said.

Enders are in better spirits now than when The Early November released their last full album, “Lilac,” in 2019. The band lost their label rep when “Lilac” was released by Rise Records, based in Los Angeles.

“There was uncertainty about what the future was really going to look like,” Enders said.

Even though “Twenty” has just been released, The Early November is working on brand new music, which should be released in the fall of next year, Enders said. This will be the second of the band’s two-album deal with Pure Noise.

“It will be very different. It will be cool, a good listen,” Enders said.

]]>
Iowa City punk gig benefits domestic violence intervention program https://gogogoairheart.com/iowa-city-punk-gig-benefits-domestic-violence-intervention-program/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 04:26:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/iowa-city-punk-gig-benefits-domestic-violence-intervention-program/ IOWA CITY, Iowa (KCRG) — About 100 people, many wearing band t-shirts to show off their true punk rock, gathered at the James Theater in Iowa City for music and a good cause Saturday night. Proceeds from Saturday night’s concert went to the Domestic Violence Intervention Program. Alta Medea, with DVIP, said there was a […]]]>

IOWA CITY, Iowa (KCRG) — About 100 people, many wearing band t-shirts to show off their true punk rock, gathered at the James Theater in Iowa City for music and a good cause Saturday night.

Proceeds from Saturday night’s concert went to the Domestic Violence Intervention Program. Alta Medea, with DVIP, said there was a connection between the nonprofit’s work and punk rock.

“The punk movement, you know, has had a lot of back and forth in history, but it’s always kind of these vulnerable communities taking a stand,” Medea said. “That’s part of what’s really exciting tonight is you taking a stand for survivors and saying, ‘We’re here and we’re going to provide for people. “”

The money raised will be used to help victims of domestic violence to escape their violent situation.

“$47,000 is about what we spend annually on hotel stays in our eight-county service area,” Medea said. “About $35,000 spent in Johnson County alone, obviously one of the most expensive places to have a hotel, especially during football season.”

Medea added that hotel rooms are in addition to running a shelter.

“When our shelter is full, which is 365 days a year, it gives us the opportunity to move other people and get them to safety and then bring them to our emergency shelter,” said said Medea.

The need for $47,000 is precipitated by the end of COVID-19 funding. DVIP faces a return to pre-pandemic funding levels, a 60% reduction from the past two years.

The funding cut comes as Medea said DVIP is seeing an “unprecedented increase” in the number of people needing services.

Medea said she didn’t expect to raise the $47,000 at the punk concert, which had sold 98 tickets when KCRG-TV9 spoke to her before the show started. However, she said everything helped.

Those who want to donate can do so. here.

]]>