Post Punk – Go Go Go Airheart http://gogogoairheart.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:16:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gogogoairheart.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Post Punk – Go Go Go Airheart http://gogogoairheart.com/ 32 32 NOS Primavera Sound – Porto, Portugal 2022 Recap https://gogogoairheart.com/nos-primavera-sound-porto-portugal-2022-recap/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:07:47 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/nos-primavera-sound-porto-portugal-2022-recap/ NOS Primavera Sound – Porto, Portugal 2022 Recap June 27, 2022 By Mark Moody Photograph by Christa Joyner Moody Web-exclusive Having previously spent time at the base of Primavera Sound in Barcelona, ​​a branch of Primavera’s oldest side show in Porto, Portugal was a no-brainer for our coverage team. The line-up of decades-old infallible artists […]]]>

NOS Primavera Sound – Porto, Portugal 2022 Recap

June 27, 2022

Photograph by Christa Joyner Moody
Web-exclusive
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Having previously spent time at the base of Primavera Sound in Barcelona, ​​a branch of Primavera’s oldest side show in Porto, Portugal was a no-brainer for our coverage team. The line-up of decades-old infallible artists (the reunited Pavement, Dinosaur Jr., Slowdive) mixed with up-and-coming artists (Little Simz, Rina Sawayama, black midi, Dry Cleaning) was enough of an impetus for our team to jumps at the chance to cover their first festival since 2019 and have the opportunity to explore a country yet to be visited. In the end, our coverage team found Portugal so inviting that they opted to stay for an extra week of exploration.

Aside from one day being dropped off at the wrong end of the beautiful Parque du Cidade, which apparently rivaled the length of New York’s Central Park with dozens of pounds of camera gear, all went well for the three-day event. days. As mentioned in our preview article (and something other festivals should keep in mind), NOS Primavera Sound ran Thursday through Saturday nights, giving workers a day to recover from the ending. of the festival at 6 o’clock in the morning (!). Indie-oriented bands tended to end with end times around 2 a.m., leaving the early morning hours mostly to EDM artists and DJ sets.

Covering four outdoor stages and a few smaller indoor sets, there was always plenty to enjoy. Notably, Portuguese fans have been meticulous about staying on entire sets before moving on to the next one, likely in part because Porto aren’t likely to bring these bands to town on a regular basis – many artists have noted that it’s was their first performance in Portugal. . Three of the four exterior stages were side by side, allowing for quick transitions from act to act.

Penelope Islands
Penelope Islands
Penelope Islands
Penelope Islands
Penelope Islands
Penelope Islands
Stella Donnelly
Stella Donnelly
Stella Donnelly
Stella Donnelly
Sky Ferreira
Sky Ferreira
Sky Ferreira
Sky Ferreira
Sky Ferreira
Sky Ferreira

Our Day 1 coverage started with the UK band Penelope Islands. The five-track-lead brother and sister (Lily and Jack Wolter) seemed to be having the time of their lives and transitioned easily from shoegaze-y led tunes to simpler pop-oriented songs. One of the most refreshing sets of the three days came from a main stage staged by the Australians Stella Donnelly, which replaced at the last minute the much missed Japanese breakfast. Donnelly exuded as much charm as she did salty language and joked that while some of her songs tended to be gritty, she didn’t feel gritty at all that day. And as far as we know, Donnellly also performed the only handstand in the performance with a little help from one of his bandmates. Sky Ferreira The set was one of the most anticipated considering she hadn’t played a set in almost three years and it predated her Primavera Barcelona set by a few days. Unfortunately, between a few technical issues and perhaps a bit of pre-set jitters, Ferreira only had time for a six-song set, but previewed some new material. Following his set here, according to his social media posts, Ferreira seems to have hit his stride and is enjoying being back in the pop music spotlight.

Nick Cave
Nick Cave
Nick Cave
Nick Cave
noon black
noon black

Even though there was a lot of music afterwards, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds actually got the top spot headlining the night with a full two-hour performance. Cave’s legendary live performance dynamics were on full display, as he marched on the first song to come face-to-face and arm-in-arm with his most ardent fans (our photographer was one of four “caught at the trap” on the right side of the podium, leading to some of our best shots from the festival). We caught two more acts after Cave’s set. One of the two most punishing sets we took over the course of three days came from noon black. The crowd at hand was whipped up by the band’s recorded introduction by a heavyweight title fight announcer and their precisely played, yet equally impactful game was a knockout winner. Closing night (for us at least) was the one we stayed for in full. by Caroline Polachek the vocals are truly otherworldly and knowing that her setlist ended with “Caroline Shut Up” and “So Hot Your Hurting My Feelings”, it was essential to stick around until the end.

Montanhas Azuis
Montanhas Azuis
beach bunny
beach bunny
beach bunny
beach bunny
Rina Sawayama
Rina Sawayama
Rina Sawayama
Rina Sawayama
Coastal fever
Coastal fever
100 gecs
100 gecs
Curb
Curb
Curb
Curb
Slow dive
Slow dive
Slow dive
Slow dive

Once the festival layout was set, Days 2 and 3 flowed seamlessly. We made a point of going to the festival site for the opening day 2, the Portuguese based Montanhas Azuis (Blue Mountains for the less literate). Playing as a five-piece band, with plenty of keyboards (!), Marco Franco led the way with a classic Casio sound. Although they weren’t wearing their patent blue rain jackets, there were plenty of flashy shirts on display. And their nostalgic offbeat calliope-based sounds reminded us of the Tenniscoats/Notwist Spirit Fest spin-off band in a good way. Then on the main stage, the American power-popsters beach bunny which charmed an early-day crowd. One of the many highlights of Day 2, Japan Rina Sawayama held court on the Cupra stage across the park. It was obvious from the first seconds of his set that Sawayama had dramatically upped his game to rival the biggest pop/dance stars of the day. Flanked by dancers for most of her set, expect big things as the calendar prepares for her second album due out this fall. Nighttime coverage began with two different performances. australia Coastal fever presented an ever more mature and tight sound from their early days while retaining a flair for a catchy melody. Attracting one of the most rowdy crowds at the festival, 100 Gecs couldn’t have been further from anything resembling a melody. Their mix of backing tracks, noise and non-stop strobe effects, over which the duo vocalizes something between rapping and the shouted word, was something to behold. The headliner of the day was the reconstituted Curb playing only their third set in over 10 years. Stephen Malkmus and his crew were in great shape, and having not seen them since their last album tour in 1999, Bob Nostanovich’s uninterrupted presence on stage quickly came to mind. Highlights from the set included incredibly loose “Grave Architecture,” Scott Kannenberg’s lead on “Date with IKEA,” and a fair ragged performance of the opening track “Two States.” Pavement’s performance on the main stage was preceded by sets with equally nostalgic turns from Slow dive and beck (which did not allow photos of this set).

Dry cleaning
Dry cleaning
Dry cleaning
Dry cleaning
Dry cleaning
Dry cleaning
Dinosaur Jr.
Dinosaur Jr.
Dinosaur Jr.
Dinosaur Jr.
Little Simz
Little Simz

The performances of the last day were fortunately honored by a third consecutive day of good weather. Late night sets from Interpol and Gorillaz were bypassed in favor of performances earlier in the day. First, as the pitch opened up, the day was Dry cleaning, who, along with several other NOS Primavera Sound artists, have a new album coming this year. The Florence Shaw fronted band delivered the goods with Shaw’s monotonous observations blanketing the band’s searing post-punk sound palette. Shaw showcased as much showmanship as anyone else on the bill while hardly ever moving a muscle, mostly with an eye roll and a shrug. She struggled not to break her cold, calm and detached demeanor given the enthusiastic response from the crowd. Based in Houston Khruangbin (who also didn’t allow photos) brought their heavy groove to a packed crowd on the Cupra stage, which turned out to host some of the festival’s most enthusiastic sets. retro act of the day, Dinosaur Jr., played a solid set on the main stage even though all the band gear was lost somewhere between here and Florence (seeing J. Mascis start the set on a borrowed Jazzmaster was a bit telling that something was wrong) . Bassist and Sebadoh founder Lou Barlow played the role of passionate MC while Mascis shunned audience banter in exchange for a loose, musically emotive set that evoked Neil Young’s Crazy Horse at its highest. The last set we caught before heading out of the festival a bit earlier than previous nights was London Little Simz. She recognizes his name, with his childhood nickname, Simbi, on the lights throughout the set. His stature is supplanted by a huge stage presence and close connection to the crowd. There is no doubt that everyone present was won over or followed Simz’s every move and command. Her breakdown of her routine for the day leading up to her set was as uplifting as it was comforting – describing a hotel massage session that was necessary for her to give her fans her best.

If you’re looking for a more laid-back alternative to the main Primavera event in Barcelona, ​​but want a carefully curated line-up of artists, NOS Primavera Sound may be a good bet for you. The festival runs as smoothly and as on time as anything we’ve seen with seamless stage changes with fairly elaborate requests. Porto is a beautiful city steeped in history with plenty to offer for an extended stay before or after the festival. Pavement and Dinosaur Jr. were both spotted at our hotel and were on hand before and after the festival enjoying what the city has to offer. Our hotel’s indie rock elite gave way to a high-end car rally crowd that had more than a few similarities. A great and welcoming time was certainly had with top performances by the newest and most established artists. Primavera is also hosting events in Los Angeles, Brazil, Chile and Argentina later in the year.

www.primaverasound.com/en/porto

Support under the radar on Patreon.

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SCVNews.com | June 25-Sept. 8: Exhibition organized by CalArts ‘Torn Apart’ at the Pacific Design Center https://gogogoairheart.com/scvnews-com-june-25-sept-8-exhibition-organized-by-calarts-torn-apart-at-the-pacific-design-center/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:46:50 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/scvnews-com-june-25-sept-8-exhibition-organized-by-calarts-torn-apart-at-the-pacific-design-center/ On Saturday, June 25, Torn Apart: Punk, New Wave + the Graphic Aftermath, 1976-86 opens at the PDC Design Gallery at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood. Curated and curated by California Institute of the Arts graphic design professor Michael Worthington, Torn Apart is the largest exhibition of punk and new wave graphic design […]]]>

On Saturday, June 25, Torn Apart: Punk, New Wave + the Graphic Aftermath, 1976-86 opens at the PDC Design Gallery at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood.

Curated and curated by California Institute of the Arts graphic design professor Michael Worthington, Torn Apart is the largest exhibition of punk and new wave graphic design ever on the West Coast. Featuring nearly 1,000 ephemeral pieces of graphic design produced between 1976 and 1986, mostly from England and the United States, the show includes posters, flyers, publications, zines, clothing, stickers and buttons from the bands, artists and media that helped define punk and new wave.

“And while the exhibit is to some degree concerned with the history of music, it is more than anything, very deliberately and unapologetically, a graphic design exhibit,” Worthington said. “This exhibition draws on the duality of graphic ephemera: both worthless and priceless, ubiquitous but treasures. What would one of us give to possess the lost treasures of our youth? These graphic works, made by trained and untrained designers, are the visual representations of a subculture at the height of its power. These works become index traces of our lost past, emotional tokens/totems that act as vehicles for time travel.

Beginning with the visual explosion that occurred when punk, both the music and the formative subculture, was born, Torn Apart follows the journey until punk implodes, producing a wide range of aesthetics and agendas in its wake, constantly penetrating mainstream design culture. As the exhibit explains, “the lasting influence and legacy of punk and new wave still lingers in the air today.”

The items were taken from author and collector Andrew Krivine’s Too Fast to Live collection, one of the largest private collections of punk and post-punk graphic design and memorabilia in the world. Krivine’s cousin John Krivine founded flagship punk stores Acme Attractions and BOY in 1970s London. Alongside posters and flyers of more than 70 influential bands and performers of the era, you’ll find vintage punk photographs by famed music photographer Sheila Rock.

On view until September 8, Torn Apart features works by well-known designers including Barney Bubbles, Jamie Reid, Malcolm Garrett, Peter Saville, Chris Morton, Vivienne Westwood, Mike Coles, Gee Vaucher, Winston Smith and Raymond Pettibon . It also features works by lesser-known designers in the United States such as John Angus, Martin Kaye, X3 and Alex McDowell, as well as pieces made by the musicians themselves and a plethora of unknown and uncredited designers, amateurs and professionals. .

Torn Apart: Punk, New Wave + the Graphic Aftermath, 1976-86 will hold an opening reception on Saturday, June 25, from 6-9 p.m. RSVP required.

Gallery hours:

Tuesday – Friday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturdays: July 9, July 23, August 6, August 20, September 3, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Free and open to the public

Pacific Design Center

8687 Melrose Ave,

West Hollywood, California 90069

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We♥KC – June 22-30, 2022 Upcoming Shows (Kansas City / Lawrence KS) https://gogogoairheart.com/we%e2%99%a5kc-june-22-30-2022-upcoming-shows-kansas-city-lawrence-ks/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 21:43:05 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/we%e2%99%a5kc-june-22-30-2022-upcoming-shows-kansas-city-lawrence-ks/ saturday june 25 Big Slick Party/Benefit w Rob Riggle, Paul Rudd, Eric Stonestreet, and David Koechner (?), T-Mobile Center, $75 to $375. What started out as a benefit poker tournament (hence the poker hand name) turned into a jam-packed weekend and arena-sized party/show, which allowed raised more than $13 million for Childrens […]]]>

saturday june 25

Big Slick Party/Benefit w Rob Riggle, Paul Rudd, Eric Stonestreet, and David Koechner (?), T-Mobile Center, $75 to $375.

What started out as a benefit poker tournament (hence the poker hand name) turned into a jam-packed weekend and arena-sized party/show, which allowed raised more than $13 million for Childrens Mercy-Kansas City.

Between acts like Sheryl Crow, David Cook, The Potash Twins and many celebrities, item auctions and experiential auctions take place (online too) for special and unique collectibles and keepsakes. Celebrities expected include Adam ScottSNL Heidi Gardner, Kevin Pollak, James Van Der Beck, and others, including some sports stars possibly added late.

children’s mercy is a leading independent children’s health organization dedicated to holistic care, translational research, breakthrough innovation and training the next generation of caregivers. Its vision is to create a world of well-being for children and for more information visit childrensmercy.org. (Note that there is no Saturday morning bowling or red carpet arrivals this year).

Glenn Miller Orchestra, Kauffman Center. $59.50-$79.50

It doesn’t mean anything if he doesn’t have that swing!– The 80-year-old man Glenn Miller Orchestra brings timeless classics such as “In the Mood”, “Moonlight Serenade”, “Chattanooga Choo Choo”, “Pennsylvania 6-5000”, “String of Pearls” and “Tuxedo Junction” to the stage with over eighteen musicians and singers.

Eddie Montgomery, Knucklesheads. $37.50

The remaining half of the famous country duo Montgomery Gentry hits the road with all their live favorites plus new songs from his solo debut, Ain’t no shutting me down and recent Tanya Tucker collaboration, “Higher”.

Housewifelemonade park, $15

KC’s beloved indie folk project fronted by Nathan Dickerson and Nathan Paver promoting a new EP, the flower and new single “Headlights”. DURY open.

]]> Catbandcat: An experience – La Mancunion https://gogogoairheart.com/catbandcat-an-experience-la-mancunion/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:11:33 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/catbandcat-an-experience-la-mancunion/ Lyrics by Elilee Arulkumar. Last February, before their first festival and gig (certainly a feat few bands can accomplish), I had a chat with catbandchat, an experimental student band (consisting of bass, synth, guitar, vocals, violin, trumpet and drum machine) that leaves the audience unable to explain what they have just seen. I had spoken […]]]>

Lyrics by Elilee Arulkumar.

Last February, before their first festival and gig (certainly a feat few bands can accomplish), I had a chat with catbandchat, an experimental student band (consisting of bass, synth, guitar, vocals, violin, trumpet and drum machine) that leaves the audience unable to explain what they have just seen. I had spoken to a few viewers before and after their concerts, with one person describing them as “orchestral EDM” and others simply unable to find the right words. I would ‘categorize’ them as an experience.

Their response to a question about the genre of their music is self-conscious confusion, Mhairi considering it a “very valid question”, with Tomas proclaiming that they “just give a fuck”. Apparently, the question of what kind of music the septet does causes quite a controversy in the group, but in reality, it can be seen as “a bit of pop…hop…alternative…electric…experimental…art-pop…post- punk”. Rory is a fan of Mikey’s usual answer to the question – that as long as it’s not independent, they’re okay with being called anything.

The theatrical element of their music seems to be what audiences know them for. In music, there is usually this dichotomy between “live” and “recorded”. Jazz historian Ted Gioia says that “whereas early recordings hoped to replicate the sound of a live performance, today musicians are more inclined to adjust public performances in order to recreate the sound of a studio recording” . This, for him, stands in contrast to jazz which relies on improvisation to create “imperfect art”, emphasizing the importance of live performance in the genre. I think Catbandcat’s incorporation of recorded elements into their live music, which is still clearly very improvisational, combines this historical importance of “live” with modern technology, to create truly “theatrical” music (like Rory the call).

In our discussion about it, they explained that while it became a very important tenet in their style, it actually started out as a happy accident. “Early on, we just couldn’t find a drummer, so we just put some beats on the sampler and took it from there,” Tomas explains. Rory recalls that “right from the start, having a rehearsal and talking either we’re a band that want to have a drummer but don’t and we’ll get one in the future, or we don’t want to have one and we’ll see. how this limitation takes us”. Their songs basically start on the computer and then they play along, adding and removing elements as they go.

Limitation and experimentation as a result of challenges also seem to be part of how the band continues to produce crazy sounds. Few bands have 2 melodicas but Deniz and Rory started duets together in their house during lockdown which led Mikey to ask Rory to write a song with ‘a dare’ – he said said, write one with a melodica. The band enjoys the theatrical element of their wacky instrumentation so much that they are considering including a side sibilant to their new song.

We talked about their influences for much of the conversation. I attributed a lot of that to jazz, but I found that wasn’t necessarily the case. Surprisingly, while I thought it was largely spontaneous improvisation, I learned that for a lot of songs written by Mikey, the parts are all written out. Anyway, in Mhairi’s words about improvising when it happens: “It’s not traditional improvisation – because we’re not following a framework, or working out chords, well we are but it’s not like a lead sheet it’s just like we throw her in there Marla changes a lot what she plays especially the one where you two are just and where you play the guitar and sing, sometimes you come out with ridiculous lines and I’m like “’hat??’” Marla, quite humbly, replies that “sometimes there’s nothing”.

Apparently, a lot of their influence also came from the UoM composition module, which they said had “forced” them to try “lots of random stuff.” Also, although they all have different musical tastes, Bjӧrk and Jockstrap stand out as big influences, although Mhairi claims that their tastes all overlap now because Mikey used to put his music all the way into their old house. Basically, subliminal messages from Mikey to make music he likes sound.

They each attribute jazz influences to other people, and the way they all think about music is clearly very different, but it obviously blends very well. Tomas notes that Mikey and Deniz have strong jazz backgrounds, “but actually I think Rory too, the way he talks about his pieces is a bit more abstract. So he says there’s world 1 and world 2, and they’re related to each other but they’re completely different and you have a lot of room. And there we go – let’s go! And you are like? Deniz claims it’s because Rory is a drama student.

In the end, I would say that I had two main takeaways from the group. The first beautiful thing I learned from our conversation was how the things that I (and probably other audience members) perceived as very deep and profound stylistic choices – like their name (which became because it was the only chat-related instagram handle available), and the incorporation of recorded material into the performance (which happened in the absence of a drummer) – started out as mere happy accidents. The second thing was how well the band got along. I asked about their future plans, and while the group formed (again, quite by chance) from a group chat, they think they’ll try to stay together because they are such good friends.

The next possible dates to discover Catbandcat live and in the flesh are for Cut Loose Fest (18.06) and Feline Fest 2 (20.06) – follow their instagram (@catbandcat) to stay up to date!

Photo: Catbandcat playing Fuel in November 2021 by Maddie Drake @ The Mancunion

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Paul Klee: The NHL’s next big team stakes its territory in Avs’ 7-0 loss to Lightning | Colorado avalanche https://gogogoairheart.com/paul-klee-the-nhls-next-big-team-stakes-its-territory-in-avs-7-0-loss-to-lightning-colorado-avalanche/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 10:56:40 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/paul-klee-the-nhls-next-big-team-stakes-its-territory-in-avs-7-0-loss-to-lightning-colorado-avalanche/ DENVER • Say hello, Tampa. Heckuva run. Now the Avs have the next one. With a flurry of goals at another pop-punk concert at the Ball Arena, the Avalanche beat the Lightning 7-0 on Saturday night in what hockey historians will recognize as the passing of the torch. ABC analyst and Hall of Famer Mark […]]]>

DENVER • Say hello, Tampa. Heckuva run.

Now the Avs have the next one.

With a flurry of goals at another pop-punk concert at the Ball Arena, the Avalanche beat the Lightning 7-0 on Saturday night in what hockey historians will recognize as the passing of the torch. ABC analyst and Hall of Famer Mark Messier, 61, called it “the best team-playing performance I’ve ever seen in my life.” It was the most dominant playoff performance these hills had seen from any Denver team, in any sport, too.

The Avs are two wins away from a Stanley Cup title, while somehow speeding up the streak. Now they’re heading to the road, where the Avs are 7-0 in the playoffs.

With 17 minutes left in the regulations, 18,000 faithful chanted “We want the Cup!” – a chorus that will seep into Amalie Arena in Game 3 on Monday. No one in Tampa is going to believe it. The Avs hold a 2-0 series lead and Nathan MacKinnon is yet to score in the Stanley Cup Finals. All the other guys do damage. One wonders how it would go with a healthy Sam Girard and Nazem Kadri as well.

Strange things and comebacks happen in sports. It’s not that the Lightning can’t overcome a 0-2 series deficit. Shoot, they did in the previous round against Rangers. But there hasn’t been much in two games to suggest the Lightning can beat the Avalanche four times in five games. And that is the task now.

The advantage of traveling with hockey sticks is that you can carry a broom and no one will notice. Can the Avs finish sweeping Florida for a second time in the Stanley Cup Final? This Avs postseason was even more impressive than the 1996 Florida Panthers sweep that turned Denver into a hockey town with a football problem. The Avs average more than five goals per game in the Conference Finals and Stanley Cup Finals. They turn the best teams in the NHL into displays of skill. And now goaltender Darcy Kuemper is throwing shutouts. God bless him.

Tampa’s reign expires in real time. You know it, I know it, the Lightning know it.

Also in the first period, Tampa’s actions spoke true. The Lightning started three separate skirmishes away from the puck, pushing and shoving Kuemper at every opportunity. Who knows? Maybe all that nonsense kept Kuemper from falling asleep there. This funny business was the most dangerous action Kuemper had seen all night.

Watching back-to-back champions resort to cheap stuff told the same story as the scoreboard – 3-0 after the first period, 5-0 after the second, 7-0 when Coors Field burst across town and the baseball video board flashed the last seconds of the hockey game. A cheering crowd singing Blink-182’s “All the Small Things” like it’s a church hymn is days away from witnessing the bigger thing.

Tampa’s frustration showed in scrum after scrum as the score spiraled out of control.

“You go through periods during the year when you’re playing well and when you’re not,” Tampa coach Jon Cooper said afterwards.

Props for a championship trainer, but that’s not a spell. It’s the next great team to stake out its territory. Tampa shouldn’t be offended. The Avs do that to everyone. They are 4-0 against the Lightning this season. At this rate, the Avs were playing their last game at home.

Just in case one lucky person attends their first Avs game, the Ball Arena DJ (DJ Triple T) dropped a friendly reminder that blowouts are a norm: “This Is How We Do It” by Montell Jordan.

The Avs are 14-2 in the playoffs. To put that into perspective, according to ESPN Stats, only five teams have made it. The other four won the Cup. Don’t say, just say.

After just 2:57 of play, Valeri Nichushkin scored to make it 1-0. He’s with the second power play, not the headliners, and that doesn’t matter to the Avs. Scoring comes from everywhere. Take the next goal, a wrist from Josh Manson. He’s on the second defensive pair, not the headliner, and Manson was assisted by Andrew Cogliano (welcome, sir) and Alex Newhook. They are in the fourth line.

The Lightning are down 0-2 while keeping MacKinnon relatively quiet. The Avs scored at even strength, on a power play, even shorthanded, the last a goal by Cale Makar.

Makar’s next goal made it 7-0 at 8:32 p.m. local time. Tampa had an early Saturday night.

There were no cheers in the press box at the roof level of section 326. But as a fan of greatness, the Avs kept me on my feet the whole game, the advantage of having only a wall behind you. Witnessing the greatness of Nikola Jokic over two MVP seasons was a thrill one night (when the games were on TV for normal people). Nolan Arenado, third, made the Rockies’ losses worth a ticket.

What the Avs have done is one of the toughest jobs in sport, breaking a champion’s heart. And it breaks. You know it, I know it. After an Avs show for the ages, the Lightning know it.

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Best Phoenix Shows This Weekend: Ben Folds, Keshi, Calexico https://gogogoairheart.com/best-phoenix-shows-this-weekend-ben-folds-keshi-calexico/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/best-phoenix-shows-this-weekend-ben-folds-keshi-calexico/ Want to see a show this weekend? You have plenty of options at your disposal, including acts and entertainers like Ben Folds, Keshi, and Calexico, all of whom have concerts scheduled at Metro Phoenix concert halls for all three nights from Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19. June. Below are details on each of […]]]>

Want to see a show this weekend? You have plenty of options at your disposal, including acts and entertainers like Ben Folds, Keshi, and Calexico, all of whom have concerts scheduled at Metro Phoenix concert halls for all three nights from Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19. June.

Below are details on each of these concerts. And for even more live music in the Valley this weekend and beyond, check out our Phoenix New Times‘ online concert calendar.

Brit Floyd

friday june 17
Arizona Federal Theater, 400 West Washington Street

Something about Pink Floyd’s music has long inspired fans to want to add visuals. First it was stoned college kids syncing the band’s haunting album The dark side of the moon with the famous film inspired by Dust Bowl The Wizard of Oz to create “Dark Side of Oz”, a trippy and terrific audiovisual masterpiece. Then there was the Australian Pink Floyd Show, a tribute band that took on a life of its own. APFS guitarist and vocalist Damian Darlington decided to take the Floyd experience a step further with Brit Floyd. Formed in 2011 in Liverpool, England, the tribute act recreates the great band’s gigs and adds great visuals for flair. Prepare to step into another universe with this extraordinarily accurate and comprehensive Floyd experience, set to take place in the Arizona Federal Theater in mid-June. Tickets for the 8 p.m. concert are $38.50. Liz Tracy

Click to enlarge

Calexico’s Joey Burns and John Convertino.

Piper Ferguson

Calexic

Saturday June 18
The Van Buren, 401 West Van Buren Street

Since 1996, Tucson-born band Calexico have used a wide range of sounds to create their signature indie rock. Influenced by traditional Latin styles of mariachi, conjunto, cumbia, and tejano, Calexico brings additional elements of country, jazz, and post-rock into a microgenre that has been dubbed “black desert.” Throughout the band’s nearly 30-year history, Calexico has revolved around the duo of John Convertino and Joey Burns, but slowly incorporated influences from a host of collaborators such as Neko Case and Iron & Wine. The group has also grown to include multi-instrumentalists to fill the space with horns, woodwinds and various types of percussion. Both Convertino and Burns may have left Arizona, but the state still influences their music. Calexico’s latest album, The Watchtower, mixes Spanish and English throughout its 12 songs, exploring Southwestern landscapes in its music and lyrics. Calexico returns to the Valley later this month for a gig at the Van Buren with opening support from soul-pop singer Molly Parden. Tickets are $32 to $35. David Flecher

Click to enlarge Ben Folds.  - ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES

Ben Folds.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Ben bends

Sunday June 19
Chandler Center for the Arts, 250 North Arizona Avenue

Ben Folds has been writing piano rock oscillating between sardonic humor and commentary on the human condition since his debut with Ben Folds Five. Along the way, he was chosen for many things – a father, a comedian and a producer – but above all, he remained an artist. Later this month, Folds will bring his In Actual Person Live for Real tour, which consists of solo piano and orchestral performances, to the Chandler Center for the Arts. Expect to hear essential songs and deep cuts such as “Jesusland,” “Zak and Sara,” “Landed,” and “Sentimental Guy” during the concert, which begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $46 to $76. Melissa Fossum and Benjamin Leatherman

Click to enlarge Keshi is on tour behind his debut album, Gabriel.  -VINCE AUNG

Keshi is on tour behind his debut album, Gabrielle.

Vince Aung

Keshi

Sunday June 19
The Van Buren, 401 West Van Buren Street

After a period of self-reflection, R&B/hip-hop artist Keshi returned earlier this year with the release of his debut album, Gabrielle. Critical praise poured in for the record, which strayed from its usual soulful sound. The Houston native began his music career in 2017, releasing self-produced tracks on SoundCloud. His sound was a mix of lo-fi beats and soulful vocals, transporting the listener into a dreamlike yet emotional state. During his short five-year career, the 27-year-old has released a string of EPs, including 2018’s the reaper, which features cuts like “2 Soon” and “Like I Need U” that helped him rack up a billion streams on services like Spotify. But it wasn’t until earlier this year that Keshi finally unleashed Gabrielle, a 12-track offering that combines an array of genres for what the artist defines as “raw” material solidified into a single work. Hear it live when Keshi comes to the Van Buren on June 19. Tickets for the 8 p.m. concert are only available through resellers. Sophia Medina

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The 39 best albums of 2022: Our favorite music of the year so far https://gogogoairheart.com/the-39-best-albums-of-2022-our-favorite-music-of-the-year-so-far/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 14:00:15 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/the-39-best-albums-of-2022-our-favorite-music-of-the-year-so-far/ Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | Spotify | Tide MJ Lenderman: boat songs Best moment: When Lenderman expresses solidarity with a supposedly flu-ridden Michael Jordan in “Hangover Game”: “Yeah, I like to drink too.” Best song: “You are every girl to me” RILY: Sports, indie rock memes, ice cold beers, fuzzy guitars –Quinn Moreland Listen/Buy: […]]]>

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | Spotify | Tide


MJ Lenderman: boat songs

Best moment: When Lenderman expresses solidarity with a supposedly flu-ridden Michael Jordan in “Hangover Game”: “Yeah, I like to drink too.”

Best song: “You are every girl to me”

RILY: Sports, indie rock memes, ice cold beers, fuzzy guitars

–Quinn Moreland

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | band camp | Spotify | Tide


Nilüfer Yanya: Painless

Best moment: a storm over the guitar distortion that thickens around “Midnight Sun”, from which Yanya’s falsetto radiates: “always I did it for you!”

Best song: “Midnight Sun”

RILY: The xx, Radiohead curvatures, alternating waves of euphoria and dysphoria

–Jayson Greene

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | band camp | Spotify | Tide


Pusha T: It’s almost dry

Best moment: When Malice arrives to close the album with a brief but triumphant Clipse reunion, and opens her verse by asking “Tell me what I missed”

Best song: “Call My Bluff”

RILY: Icy luxury, playful threats, the old adage that the Inuit have 50 words for snow, except in this case by snow we mean cocaine

–Andy Cush

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | band camp | Spotify | Tide


Ravyn Lenae: Hypno

Best moment: The bridge of “Light Me Up”, where Lenae’s falsetto reaches an exquisite, seemingly impossible upper register

Best song: “Enlighten me”

RILY: Steve Lacy’s distorted guitar melodies, flirting on the dance floor, 90s R&B

–Eric Torres

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | Spotify | Tide


Rosalia: MOTOMAMI

Best moment: The sonorous, semi-absurd raps of “Chicken Teriyaki” and “Saoko,” where she carves her voice like a shimmering blade and emerges as one of today’s stealthiest pop threats

Best song: “Saoko”

RILY: upside down reggaeton

–Philip Sherburne

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | Spotify | Tide


Jump: Air

Best moment: When the brass crashes for the first time in the choir on “Reality”

Best song: “June 55”

RILY: Dramatic choral music, epic film scores, Basil Poledouris

–Madison Bloom

Listen/Buy: Amazon | Apple Music | band camp | Spotify | Tide


Sharon Van Etten: We got it all wrong

Best moment: The buildup in “Darkness Fades” at around 1:24, when drums and keys kick in

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Live Report: Billie Eilish – The O2 Arena, London | Live https://gogogoairheart.com/live-report-billie-eilish-the-o2-arena-london-live/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 19:39:16 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/live-report-billie-eilish-the-o2-arena-london-live/ Artists like Billie Eilish come once per generation. A fierce voice of dissent in the post-Weinstein/Trump era, his hyper-aware lyricism, delivered with breathless vulnerability, sets the world right. When Billie last performed in London in 2019, she was just eighteen. A lot of life experiences happen in these nascent coming-of-age years, and it shows. Her […]]]>

Artists like Billie Eilish come once per generation. A fierce voice of dissent in the post-Weinstein/Trump era, his hyper-aware lyricism, delivered with breathless vulnerability, sets the world right.

When Billie last performed in London in 2019, she was just eighteen. A lot of life experiences happen in these nascent coming-of-age years, and it shows. Her new album revels in gothic majesty, expands in darker and weirder directions – and reflects much of how we’re all feeling right now.

Presenting his second album at the O2 in London, it felt more like a rally against the status quo than a stadium show by a mainstream artist. Conversely, this is the first time the O2 has gone exclusively vegan. The aroma of wholesome, guilt-free food wafted through the O2 entrance like a Shangri-La tent at a festival.

Jessie Reyes set the tone with an explosive and rage-filled set, oscillating between drum-laden pop-punk and salsa-tinged R&B. She recalls an anecdote about meeting a “music guy” while walking the streets of Toronto: “Girl, you can sing, but if you want to make it in this industry, you have to learn to suck cock.” “Fuck that”, she proclaims “it’s 2022” and smashes into ‘Gatekeeper’ (“Spread your legs / Open up / you could be famous”). The crowd roars in agreement. It’s a concert with a message.

Darkness descends. People are vaping and taking selfies in anticipation. A drummer appears floating in an electric white box. The spotlight is on Billie Eilish. She is an apparition in a white tracksuit with lightning stripes, crossing the expanse of darkness. As the opening bass drum of “Bury A Friend” echoes through the stadium, the crowd loses their shit. To my left, a mother and her teenage daughter embrace and sing with delight.

Billie zips through four powerful tracks from the new album (‘Therefore I Am’ stands out) with relentless, jerky momentum, underpinned by Prodigy-like visuals, as if passed through a glitchy Insta filter.

She takes a break and explains the rules of the concert. Don’t be an asshole. No judgment. Enjoy. Then explodes “You Should See Me In A Crown”, performed in deliciously dark and sultry perfection.

Playing with the audience like a cult puppeteer, she knocks them to the ground, gets up, and dances to “Oxytocin,” a rousing, up-tempo display of honeyed vocals and spidery EDM, followed by “Halley’s Comet.”

His brother and longtime collaborator joins the scene with a guitar (resembling an oddly shrunken Ed Sheeran), slowing things down with an as-yet-unreleased acoustic track. The crowd responds by waving their phones in the air like lighters.

Then the shit gets a little crazy. Billie calls for an invocation – a gratitude meditation. She thanks everyone for being there, for being yourself. You feel validated, seen. Even if you’re on your own, like this Clash writer, it’s hard not to feel part of it. If it was someone else, it would be a total party. Somehow, only Billie Eilish could pull this off at The O2.

Continuing the theme of inclusion, suddenly she is on the pedestal of a crane on the other side of the arena. Under a scorching orange light, she draws closer to the audience, no matter what slice of tickets they are in. He crawls around the stadium, as she spins 40 feet above the ground.

The most moving moment, however, is “I’m getting older.” Against the backdrop of grainy videos of Billie and her brother as children, smiling, carefree, enveloped in the joys of childhood, contrast with the lyrics “Things I once enjoyed / Just keep me a job now / The things I want / One day I’ll get tired of it…”

It’s a stark but sensitive observation about how the paths we take in life that once gave us fulfillment can turn ugly as we age. It also feels in tune with the times, intertwining the anti-work movement and “The Great Resignation” as society hurtles toward an uncertain future.

The closing track? “Bad Guy”, obviously. Billie’s Grammy-winning hit. The silly lyrics and obnoxious basslines took audiences back to simpler, happier times — a pre-pandemic spring of 2019.

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Words: Justin McDonnel

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Punk-influenced playwright Alvin Eng plays laundry in Memoir https://gogogoairheart.com/punk-influenced-playwright-alvin-eng-plays-laundry-in-memoir/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:55:08 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/punk-influenced-playwright-alvin-eng-plays-laundry-in-memoir/ Our Laundry, Our City: My Chinese-American Life, From Flushing to the Downtown Scene and Beyond Alvin Eng Empire Editions May 2022 Alvin Eng’s writing follows a conversational style: fast, easy-going, and witty. This Eng is a playwright and the stories from his memoirs Our laundry, our city are taken from his 2006 monologue The Last […]]]>

Our Laundry, Our City: My Chinese-American Life, From Flushing to the Downtown Scene and Beyond

Alvin Eng

Empire Editions

May 2022

Alvin Eng’s writing follows a conversational style: fast, easy-going, and witty. This Eng is a playwright and the stories from his memoirs Our laundry, our city are taken from his 2006 monologue The Last Emperor of Flushing contribute to the pleasures of the memoirs of Eng. Of particular note is her choice to call her family matriarch “The Empress Mother”, a name that not only describes her temperament but also the particular stories of an immigrant family that began with a paper woman and extends to Alvin, the youngest of five siblings. who grew up spending much of her life behind the scenes of a laundry service in Flushing, New York.

The Empress Mother is a loving caricature that neutralizes Eng’s mother, allowing the reader to understand the complexities of family dynamics. Her reluctance to speak English kept her away from laundry customers and having to interact with teachers, neighbors and others. Eng notes that both of his parents were deeply devoted to their children but due to their arranged marriage, they weren’t particularly attached to each other.

Eng revisits tropes from Asian immigrant memoirs, finding humor in his eagerness to assimilate, making extensive use of 1970s popular culture to connect with classmates and peers. Rather than dwell on the teasing he suffered as a cultural outsider, Eng focused on the opportunities he had to use music and cartoons to bond with friends. He explains, with some regret mixed with love, that his siblings named him after Alvin the Chipmunk and that the three eldest siblings named the fourth child Herman, after the cartoon character single image of the same name. Alvin admits that for many years he thought TV character Herman Munster inspired the name, but The Munsters did not air until well after Herman was born.

His story is also one of growing up and navigating the age differences between him and his older siblings who had their own experiences of assimilation. His sister and brothers started their lives in the rooms behind the laundromat: Alvin’s childhood was mostly swung between the laundromat and his home in the suburbs. While telling his story, Eng recounts the lives of his mother and father in China and how they each emigrated to the United States while immigration quotas were still in place. The emotional impact of their struggles, as well as their separation from their families in China, impacted their parenting. Through their stories, Eng is better able to understand how his relationships with them shaped his own identity.

Our laundry, our city also offers a slice of Flushing’s cultural history. Eng navigates the famous neighborhood of Chinatown, writing about his friendships with Jewish-American and Italian-American schoolmates and how he learned to find a place in both cultures. As an avid fan of punk and rock music, Eng reflects on the relationship between Flushing and Manhattan, which he perceived as the ultimate cultural hub he couldn’t belong to as a kid in Queens.

“Like most of my friends in Flushing stayed in local heavy metal and prog rock cliques, I dove headlong into the punk rock and new wave scenes that seep into ‘The City,'” writes Eng . “Befitting NYC’s bankrupt and crumbling infrastructure, this DIY (do it yourself) punk/new wave ethos was, if not a completely fresh breath of air, a breath of less polluted air for the school-bored, street-savvy teenagers of the late 1970s.” In a performance piece currently in progress, Eng’s punk rock spirit is mixed with his personal history, investigating the prevalence of addiction to opium among Chinese diaspora men of his grandfather’s generation. Here Comes Johnny Yen Again (or How I Kicked Punk) is the last of Eng’s plays to be performed off-Broadway and in theaters across the United States.

Although he finally finds his way to the city, he reflects on the difficulties of reinventing himself in New York when his past is only a few train stops away. While in college, Eng’s fandom blossomed into freelance writing gigs in the music press. He interned at A&M Records and then landed a job as a publicity assistant for Island Records. Eng finds that at music industry functions he was usually the only Chinese person present. The question to get to know you, “Where are you from?” often has a catch for first-generation Americans. Eng’s response to “Flushing” did not serve as an adequate answer, so a second question often followed: “Where are you really from?” He remembers having met Marc Storace, the leader of the Krocus group, and having surveyed this dialogue. When Eng says his parents are from Canton in southern China, Storace asks if he’s ever considered visiting them. The answer had always been a resounding “no”, but that moment opened the door for Eng to embrace his Chinese heritage.

He traveled to China with The Empress Mother, then joined the staff of the media and arts advocacy group. Asian CineVision At New York. Eng writes that it was a turning point in his professional life and his worldview and “desire to belong as an adult”. Growing up in a bilingual household shaped her identity, but her Chinese skills were still somewhat raw. Eng recounts the great pride he felt in working at the International Asian American Film Festival in New York in 1988. “The time had finally come to cross the final frontier: speaking the mother tongue…a bit like when television Kung Fu master Kwai Chang Kaine was ready to snatch this pebble from his master’s hand.

He goes on to explain that he was trying to form a line for ticket holders outside the theater, but despite his careful pronunciation, onlookers seemed taken aback by his request. “From behind me, I heard a loud peal of laughter from my Hong Kong-born supervisor,” Eng writes. asking ticket holders to line up in front of him, he would shout, “Big: come on!”

Despite this humorous setback, he became deeply involved in the Asian theater scene in New York, earned an MFA from NYU, and eventually served as a Fulbright Artist-in-Residence in Hong Kong in 2011. Later, he was a guest by the United States. Embassy to organize theater workshops in Guangzhou, China. Eng’s contentment in fully embracing both his American and Chinese identity is full of humor and heart. Her mastery of cultures – not only in New York and China, but also in rock music, theatrical performance, playwriting and journalism – lends itself to an engaging, multi-faceted memoir.

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How to be Emo, Screamo and Punk in Dallas this summer https://gogogoairheart.com/how-to-be-emo-screamo-and-punk-in-dallas-this-summer/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 21:49:11 +0000 https://gogogoairheart.com/how-to-be-emo-screamo-and-punk-in-dallas-this-summer/ Sometimes music is the best way to reminisce. It can be easy to forget the glory days experienced in 2022. You may wonder, what exactly were the glory days? The glory days were when Hot Topic was thriving, and their TV screens were jamming out to the latest hot tracks from MTV or Vans Warped […]]]>

Sometimes music is the best way to reminisce. It can be easy to forget the glory days experienced in 2022. You may wonder, what exactly were the glory days? The glory days were when Hot Topic was thriving, and their TV screens were jamming out to the latest hot tracks from MTV or Vans Warped Tour. It was when you walked down the halls of high school with your headphones on singing My Chemical Romance or The Cure to your heart’s content. These days. Let’s loop things back. You’ll be surprised how retro Dallas can be. Here’s a complete guide to all things emo, punk, and shouto in Dallas.

Let’s talk concerts and festivals

There are so many ways to see your favorite post-punk, pop-punk and shouto bands in Dallas. This is the perfect time to start building your itinerary as many tours are about to begin. Here are a few that are coming to town.

July 12 – sad summer festival

August 1 – Rise Against, The Used and Senses Fail

August 8 – New found glory

August 26 – Confessional Dashboard with Cartel

September 3 – Peter Hook and the light (my favorite)

September 28 – My Chemical Romance

How about some notable cover bands?

Did you know that Dallas is home to AMAZING cover bands? Here are a few to watch out for!

Definitely maybe Oasis – This is the OFFICIAL Dallas cover band, yes, official, Oasis. I saw them at the Granada Theater once and let’s just say when they played Supersonic my inner Liam Gallagher came out.

Van full of nuns – They’re the perfect pop-punk cover band. They play originals and all the hits. Yes, all. Expect to hear My Chemical Romance, Fall Out Boy, Blink-182 and more.

Panic “Unfortunately, the Smiths are no longer there. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t listen to Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now or Still Ill anymore. Dallas has your first cover band Morrissey and The Smiths.

The Troublemakers – This is DFW’s WEEZER cover band. This outfit puts on such a good show. Combined with an energetic and precise sound, they also put on a comedic presentation that is on par with Weezer.

Emo Hang Out Spots in Dallas

Can’t do the show? Carefree. Head to Deep Ellum for your punk/goth bar fix. Here’s where to go.

The first standing PANOPTICON. It’s a great gothic hotspot in Deep Ellum offering an industrial vibe with live DJ performances spinning your favorite tunes. Another place offering great music while mixing your favorite cocktails is punk society. This lounge concept features a design inspired by the retro era of the Punk music scene. To catch Punk Rock Karaoke at Three Links on May 21. It’s you, the mic, and your favorite tunes from the Clash, Sex Pistols, Misfits, David Bowie and more. Shooting subjecta new emo bar opening in Deep Ellum, may be your new go-to spot to listen to your favorite tracks and clips from bands that headlined the Vans Warped tours of your youth, like Panic at the Disco and The Used while you sip creative cocktails and ask your friends to write on your black marker converse.

More emo-filled events to look forward to

June 20 – Bayside and three times

July 16 – Tribute evening The Smiths, Morrissey, Depeche Mode

22nd of July – Emo Night Tour

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